why we need to calculate macros

Why we need to calculate our macros for keto weight loss, and how to do it

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email

A crucial part of successfully losing weight on the ketogenic diet is eating the right amounts of carbs, fats, and proteins. If you eat too many carbs, your ketosis will be destroyed. If you eat too many protein-rich foods…your ketosis will still be destroyed! What’s more, you risk eating over your calorie allowance, hindering your chances of weight loss.

However, it’s not as easy as simply guessing or assuming when choosing your foods, as the science needs to be correct. The issue is, not everyone requires the same quantities. Everyone has a different body;  a different weight, a different height, a different metabolism, and a different lifestyle. All of these factors contribute to how much carbs, fats, and proteins you need to eat in order to sustain ketosis.

That’s all very well…but how do you figure out your own personal set of numbers? That’s what we’ll explore in this article, so you can move forward into your keto journey with a little more know-how.

Be sure of your measurements:

The reason we need to include our height, weight, and often our body fat percentage when figuring out our macros is because it helps to figure out our calorie intake.

Whether your goal is to lose fat and overall weight, or lose fat and gain muscle and overall weight, then you need to have an idea of how many calories to eat.

To lose weight, you need a deficit, to gain weight, you need a surplus. By knowing how much to eat, and how much of that food to allocate to carbs, fats, and proteins, you have a far better chance of reaching your weight goals. Technically, you don’t need to count calories when doing keto, but it does make the process easier when your reasons are weight loss or gain related.

Before you begin, be set with the following information:

Find a trusted keto calculator and apply the results to your eating plan:

You can use a formula such as the Harris-Benedict formula to manually calculate your calories and macros, but honestly, there are easier options.

Keto sites such as Ruled.Me have reliable and accurate calculators to do all of the maths for you. You can choose if you want to lose, gain, or maintain weight, and how many carbs you want to consume (the general rule is no more than 5% of your overall calorie intake or around 20 grams).

You don’t need to stick stringently to your calorie allocation, but you do need to make sure that the carbs are on or just below the recommended amount, and the fats are on or above. Just seeing the numbers and having a clearer idea of what’s expected can actually make the transition much easier and clearer.

Use an app to keep on track:

It’s almost impossible to accurately stick to your macro allowance by guesswork alone. There are always hidden carbs somewhere to trip you up. That’s why a calorie counter such as MyFitnessPal is perfect, and often crucial for keto dieters.

You can log in your desired macros, (once you’ve calculated them), and your overall calorie allowance. Whenever you log food into the app, the carbs, fats, and proteins will be displayed to you, so you always know when you’re in the perfect macro rhythm.

Conclusion

Successful ketosis requires low carbs (that magic 5% of your calorie intake!), lots of fats and moderate protein. If you simply lowered your caloric intake, cut carbs, but don’t eat enough fats, you may lose weight but it might be mostly water and not the stored fat you want to get rid of. This is why we need to be well aware of how much of each macro we are eating, which requires a bit of calculating initially. Once you’ve hit the sweet spot, the magic begins; feeling full and satisfied, enjoying more energy, and minimizing stored fat. Get online and start punching those numbers to find your personal set of calorie and macro goals.

Share this post

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email